C’Mon C’Mon C’Mon

Written, Performed, Produced, Recorded, Mixed & Mastered by Kenny Schick

Video by Jessica Fong – Adapted Creations

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C’mon C’mon C’mon started its life on a different trajectory than it ended up on: originally, I was writing a song for a placement opportunity, and the basic feeling was supposed to be ‘nostalgic’.

I got that part moving along just fine, and as it’s written now, that part would have worked out fine.

There were samples given as an idea for the type of sound and feel they were looking for, and that sound and feel leaned toward a melancholic pop/indie vibe. Usually, that is right up my alley, as well as those familiar music know. But when I’d play the song, which at first was just on acoustic guitar, I kept playing it at a certain speed, and that speed took it out of a melancholic feel. I tried to slow it down and make it more weepy, but nope…this song wouldn’t have it.
So…. I abandoned my initial mission, forgot about the placement, and served this song as it wanted to be served. It just wanted to be kind of a Brit pop type thing—a hair punky, with an upbeat feel. There was a whole other section of lyrics in the bridge, which is just instrumental now—where the widdley-woo guitar solo is. They were cool, but it was murky and just wasn’t working, so I went for some guitar fun, which fits the theme of the song, as it ended up being about my musical journey in a way, and it was ripping guitar riffs that pulled me into music in the first place.
The idea of the song is that musical styles, and even fashion styles (which often accompany music styles) always seem to repeat and come back around again… what was in style once will likely come around again—I mean, how many times has punk rock come and gone now?
We saw a time in the 90’s when the old swing sound came back around again (and everyone sounded like an updated Cab Calloway), rock-a- billy had it’s day again in the 80’s and brought with it that 50’s fashion, and here in Nashville on our favorite local radio station, Lightning 100, I hear so many bands that sound like they’ve revisited the 70’s and 80’s again for inspiration.
I’ve had a few questions asked of me regarding the line ‘the drink and then the sound is brown, ’til the strong and clear take down the town…’ — the brown drink is whiskey, the brown sound was what Eddie Van Halen’s sounds was labeled. Both of those fell out of favor at some point, but now we know bourbon is the big thing again after the years when strong, clear liquors became popular and almost destroyed the bourbon industry— and the 80’s saw that more clean sound (drum machines, clean guitars, etc.) swallow the big guitar sound. Then came the whole grunge movement and ‘alternative’ bands like Tool, Dinosaur Jr., and Smashing Pumpkins that brought back the wall of sound again.
And so it goes…round and round… what you like may pass out of favor, but it will come back around.
So sing your song!
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LYRICS:
C’Mon C’Mon C’Mon by Kenny Schick

Yesterday or years ago
it’s all the same and we don’t know
that time’s moved on
and nothing’s gone
we talk away the day and so
the night walks in and steals the show
it’s been too long
still sing that song

the one that’s always dances inmy heads
the tune that always gets me out of bed

Na Na Na Na Na Na Na

C’mon C’mon
Life’s as short as the day is long
c’mon c’mon
no one else….can sing your song c’mon c’mon c’mon

the latest style it’s all the rage
it flies away and leaves the cage
and then it’s gone
but not for long
the drink and then the sound is brown
’til the strong and clear take down the town
for today
but it’s ok

cuz it won’t be long ’til we see you again
and the coolest kids will want to be your friend

it’s new it’s old it’s bought and sold
the salvage yard then solid gold
and should it stand the test of time
rewrite the lines repeat the rhyme

SPOTIFY  |  APPLE MUSIC

2020 started with hopeful thoughts for many, but soon, premature hopes would be dashed on the proverbial rocks as 2020 tumbled down the cliff, moving ever more rapidly to becoming the worst year in recent history for the entire planet. WATCH VIDEO AT END!

Nashville suffered one of the earliest big blows of 2020, literally and figuratively, when in the early morning of March 3, a deadly and unpredicted tornado outbreak ravaged Northern and East Nashville, as well as outlying areas.

In East Nashville, where Kenny Schick, and his wife, Sabine Heusler-Schick run Basement 3 Productions, a music production company, many of the businesses that made East Nashville vibrant (including a very popular music venue, The Basement East) were torn to pieces, just a few blocks from the Schick’s ‘compound’.

Immediately following this tragedy, the whole planet went into lock down because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Nashville, being a town where music, entertainment, tourism, and restaurants make it the destination it is, and being a town full of musicians who rely on gigs and touring, immediately felt the full impact of the shutdowns. Followed immediately by Black Lives Matter protests and riots, Nashville unraveled quickly as opposing ideologies and contrary opinions about how to ‘carry on’ clashed in grand fashion. Musicians and the music industry that gives Music City it’s identity, an industry who’s employees often struggle to eek out a living even in the best of times, hangs on the verge of extinction in Nashville, and many wonder if the clubs, the artists, the hotels, the restaurants will survive. Even before 2020 reared its ugly head, concerns of rapid growth and rising housing costs had threatened the survival of an already challenged music industry, as well as the charm and history of Nashville.
It is with this whirlwind of thoughts and fears that Kenny Schick penned the song, The Ghost Of Nashville, a tribute to his hometown of just 3 years. Schick and his wife had fled the San Francisco Bay Area as some of the highest costs of living in the country had gutted the once thriving community of artists there. Schick and his wife knew Nashville was growing quickly, but both were surprised to see a place called ‘Music City’ on a trajectory to let economic growth alone potentially devour the very industry that attracts so many to Nashville from around the world. ‘The Ghost Of Nashville’ leaves listeners with lots of questions, but Schick hopes it inspires thoughts and new ideas that will lead to preserving the heart and soul of Music City.

 

A road trip to the Bluegrass State, Kentucky!

Where we were seduced by it’s extreme beauty!

 

Kentucky!
This past weekend, Sabine and I were visited here in Nashville by our great friends Lori and Pete. We showed them a bit of Nashville for a day and a half, and then we went on a road trip to the Bluegrass State, Kentucky. We were seduced by it’s extreme beauty—vast fields of lush grass and rolling hills covered in broad leaf forests.

Distilleries!
This was just icing on the cake, as our journey was really about bourbon and music. We toured the Four Roses Distillery, and the really historic Buffalo Trace Distillery… so much information and top notch Bourbon!

our journey was really about bourbon and music

Willie Watson!
Now Lori and Pete have become completely obsessed with songwriter/musician Willy Watson. Though I didn’t immediately recognize the name, I’ve know of him for years as it turns out. Watson was a founding member of Old Crow Medicine Show, and is also a member of Dave Rawlings Machine with Dave and Gillian Welch.

Buster Scruggs!
Many of y’all probably know him now too, as he was in Joel and Ethan Cohen’s recent film, ‘The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs’. He plays ‘The Kid’, who guns down Buster Scruggs (Tim Blake Nelson) at the end of the first old western tale in this film. He also sings the song ‘When A Cowboy Trades His Wings For Spurs’, penned by his colleagues Gillian Welch and Dave Rawlings. So see…you DO know him… 🙂

‘The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs’

The Burl!
Willie’s solo performance was wonderful, and the venue, The Burl, was an amazing old wood building sitting across from a distillery in Lexington, KY. Built in 1926 as a loading dock and hub for Texaco, it is a long room with porches flanking each side. The venue is right by the train tracks and has a ton of vibe. This performance was part of a weekend festival at The Burl called The Rail Roots Festival. We only went on the Sunday but now wish we’d gone the whole weekend!

The Rail Roots Festival – Willy Watson – Lera Lynn….

Lera Lynn!
Also on the bill for this festival was one of our local Nashville favorites Lera Lynn. She plays some dark, brooding post-Americana, just like Sabine and I like. She put on a stellar set as well—her guitarist, whose name I can’t find anywhere, is a great support to her songs.

Every piece of this road trip was magical, and I’ve fallen in love with state of Kentucky. Sabine and I will visit again soon for sure! Thank you to Lori and Pete Chaplin!

See other photography by Kenny Schick

Kenny Schick solo music project

 

 

A year ago today, we arrived in Nashville.

Though we’d talked about it a bit over the last several years, it was actually a pretty spontaneous move—a decision made just a little more than 2 months before our departure.

Photography by Kenny Schick – Kenny Schick is a Music Producer, engineer, singer songwriter & professional photographer, living in Nashville TN (from the Bay Area CA)  (see more photos here)

A stressful year in California and ever rising rent costs in the Bay Area, an exodus of musicians and artists, and a desire to be around people, who like us, make their living creating music in one form or another, all pointed us out of town. Along with an accident that resulted in us replacing our old Honda Civic with 300,000 on it with a newer, bigger car that would actually make it to Tennessee, and our amazing friend Chris who let us store our stuff in an empty building at his new place, we found ourselves in a position to make a big decision to give Nashville a shot.

Since Sabine and I met online in 2006 discussing music on what is now the ghost town called MySpace, our lives have been about big decisions: from my move to Australia after 8 months of emails and phone calls resulted in us falling in love, to her move to the US in 2008  to continue our relationship, to our 2 month drive/tour across the US immediately upon her arrival (interestingly centered around a gig I got at the Bluebird Cafe in Nashville), to our deciding to use my decades of experience as a musician/producer to start our own business, Basement 3 Productions.  Sabine has been an essential ingredient in helping me take thoughts and ideas that might otherwise remain in my head and make them reality. As such, she made me realize that making this big move, like most  big moves, was totally doable.

So on December 2nd, 2017, we packed up our car and left California, and on December 5th, we arrived at our first place in South Nashville near Berry Hill. We’d found it online, and the pictures were quite a glamorized version of what we actually moved into—LOL. We stayed there for the terms of our 6 month lease, and we enjoyed the urban meets rural neighborhood, but we made the move to the ‘hip’ part of town, East Nashville, as soon as our lease allowed, upon finding a house with a separate building for our studio.

I’m proud that we were brave enough to just go for it, especially given we are not 20 something, or 30 something…or….. well…. we did it!

 

Everyone asks what I think of Nashville. I have enjoyed that it is indeed music-centric. We’ve seen a ton of amazing music, eaten great food and made wonderful new friends. I am intrigued by the weather – how cold it gets in the winter, and how hot and humid it gets in the summer. I love all the summer wild life—lightning bugs, tons of butterflies and other big flying critters, and plant growth like I’ve never seen—it is literally a giant green house. I adore the summer lightning storms. Unlike California, there is no watering lawns—just fighting them back—there is visual growth within one day. Nonetheless, I still miss the even, mild temperatures of the Bay Area, of course.

I have surely had an adjustment period, all the while keeping super busy with all my fabulous California artists. I am thoroughly enjoying working and creating music in my East Nashville studio and am excited to dig deeper into the scene here. We’ve really enjoyed hosting California artists and our home/studio is always open to out-of-towners as well as locals! I am eager to keep my focus and see what this musical jewel called Nashville has to offer, and equally, what I have to offer Nashville.

We’ve met some amazing musicians here and try to incorporate as many as possible into our work. Sabine and I are immersing ourselves in the culture and the music of Nashville. We are about to release a new album as our Duo ArtemesiaBlack called Gravity – some songs inspired by our new city – and are curious to see what our second year in Music City will bring. All in all, I’m proud that we were brave enough to just go for it, especially given we are not 20 something, or 30 something…or….. well…. we did it! It’s quite an amazing adventure. We are very excited about the artists we will be working with in the coming year!

 

Instruments For Education 1st Annual Instrument Drive and Fundraiser 

Listening Room Cafe, November 15, 2018

Photography by Kenny Schick – Kenny Schick is a Music Producer, engineer, singer songwriter & professional photographer, living in Nashville TN (from the Bay Area CA)  (see more photos here)

I was lucky to be in school at a time when music and art programs were considered main staples of education—the schools I attended in California had pretty darn good instruments for music students to use, and most families, mine included, had the ability to rent or buy instruments for their kids. This access to instruments not only made it pretty easy for me to pursue my passion (my music), but could be a large part of the equation that led me down the path to a life in music. My parents were even able to float me loans(with 1% interest, just to teach me about finances..haha) which I paid back with my paper route money. 

I never had kids, but I’ve watched my friend’s children attend schools where the music and art programs are being stripped back, or even eliminated from curriculum—this is a damn shame, as music and the arts are every bit as important to human development as math, science, history, or english. It is creativity and learning how to implement it that leads to some of the biggest accomplishments for humanity—even in aspects of life that have nothing to do with music or art. Developing a creative mind is essential to success in life, and as a former private music teacher, I have seen this concept at work. I even helped run a friend’s company that used music as a tool for corporate team building workshops, and we saw the method ignite a lot of fire at some of Silicon Valley’s biggest companies. 

Here in Nashville, we have a knight in shining armor by the name of (Sir) Troy Castellano, and he has started a non-profit here to help counteract the trend of struggling music programs in our local schools—it is called Instruments For Education. It’s mission: “To collect and distribute used and unused musical instruments and provide them to classrooms that may not otherwise have it in their budget to purchase instruments. Allowing upcoming generations a hands on way to learn to play a musical instrument(s).” Troy  even goes so far as to drive around picking up instruments himself and fixing them if need be. He has a music store in Spring Hill TN(Bluesman Vintage) that does repairs that he can’t handle himself. 

Last night, I attended a great event at the Listening Room Cafe here in Nashville—It was Instruments For Education’s First Annual Instrument Drive and Fundraiser. 24 of Nashville’s best song writers volunteered their time and gave us a killer night of intimate performances, backed by the awesome steel guitar player Smith Curry see the list of performers below. Proceeds from the show went to Instruments For Education, and I believe even some instruments were donated. 

In a city called Music City, it is great that we have someone like Troy who supports the very thing this city is known for and helps to make sure future generations keep the roots and lifeblood of this city alive. 

If you want HR images without watermark let me know. EMAIL ME

 

Billy Lee

Sasha Aaron

Melissa Bollea Rowe

Michaela Clarke

Steve Metz

Hailey Verhaalen

Jordan Mitchell

Mary Kutter

Megan Barker

Taylor Goyette

Jean Nolan

Dixie Jade

Joe West

Victoria Banks

Keesy Timmer

Steven Williams

Riley Weston

Lexie Hayden

Adam Searan

Brian Desveaux

Elizabeth Lyons

Marti Dodson

Tori Martin

Ashlyn Grayce

Ava Boney